Studio Ala
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Empathy

Walk in someone else's shoes — an essential step in the human centred design process, often unintentionally overshadowed by biases. While working as Experience Design Lead at Doblin, we created a series of client workshops which started the process of internalising the importance of empathy and insights within the client organisation.

Walk in someone else's shoes — an essential step in the human centred design process, often unintentionally overshadowed by biases. While working as Experience Design Lead at Doblin, we created a series of client workshops which started the process of internalising the importance of empathy and insights within the client organisation.


Format  |  Workshop and Fieldwork
Stimulus  |  Exhibition, user videos, activity cards and worksheets
Industry  |   Financial Services
Client  |   Doblin – working as part of project team
Scope  |   Concept development, experience design, production, delivery
Location  |   London, New York, Mexico City, Hong Kong

CASE STUDY

Consumer Immersion
Workshops for groups up to 60 participants

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WHAT IS CONSUMER IMMERSION?

The consumer immersion workshop was a part of a innovation capability building programme created by Doblin.

AIM

Our aim was to communicate the concept of empathy, make it relevant to the participants' day to day work as well as allow them to practice the skills to gain an understanding of the basics and importance of ethnographic research.

PROCESS + RESULT

Creating a real world experience, and the idea of ‘stepping into someone else’s shoes’ was the underpinning concept which drove all design decisions. In each of the locations we rented two venues, a workshop space and a local cafe, to aid the contrast between desktop research and fieldwork. In the morning we immersed the client in images, objects and videos made by local people recruited by an behavioural research agency we hired; the stimulus was complimented by activities and tools to practice interviewing skills for the afternoon fieldwork session.

The second part of the day meant immersing the participants in an environment closer to the user real context. Due to the large groups sizes, we could not create the ideal home interviews, so we opted for a local cafe. Our participants met real people, whom they would not usually have access to in their day to day lives. Having practiced some basic interviewing skills beforehand we encouraged natural conversations aimed gaining real understanding of the goals and barriers the users face in their daily lives.

Photography: Armoury London / Gabriel Elder